z
zeldathemes
water-stained:

Eva Hesse
No title, c. 1963. Ink, watercolor, gouache, and crayon on paper. Collection of the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, Ohio.

water-stained:

Eva Hesse

No title, c. 1963. Ink, watercolor, gouache, and crayon on paper. Collection of the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, Ohio.

  #art    #women artists  
Deborah Luster
01-26 Location. 1800 Leonidas Street (Carrollton) Date(s). July 14, 2009 7:55 a.m. Name(s). Brian Christopher Smith (22) Notes. Face up with multiple gunshot wounds, from the Tooth for an Eye series, 2008-2012. Gelatin silver print. Collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
——
I spent a lot of time last summer at SAAM’s Democracy of Image exhibition, and this was probably my favorite piece in it. I spent a lot of time looking at it in the dimly lit Granite Gallery, enjoying my last few minutes of my lunch break. At first, it seems like a straight forward image, despite the unusual round frame, with its clean lines pulled taught, cutting across the image. But what you are also looking at what is probably the last thing somebody saw before he died. It’s eerie, elegiac, even monumental in its simplicity.
On one of these visits, I heard a young couple walk by and sneer loudly about how ridiculous it was that somebody had taken a photo of power lines and called it art. It struck me hard. It felt like they were not only dismissing the art, but the whole life and untimely, violent death of Brian Christopher Smith, whoever he may have been. It was crass, even cruel. All it took to understand this piece on its most cursory level was to read the title.

Deborah Luster

01-26 Location. 1800 Leonidas Street (Carrollton) Date(s). July 14, 2009 7:55 a.m. Name(s). Brian Christopher Smith (22) Notes. Face up with multiple gunshot wounds, from the Tooth for an Eye series, 2008-2012. Gelatin silver print. Collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

——

I spent a lot of time last summer at SAAM’s Democracy of Image exhibition, and this was probably my favorite piece in it. I spent a lot of time looking at it in the dimly lit Granite Gallery, enjoying my last few minutes of my lunch break. At first, it seems like a straight forward image, despite the unusual round frame, with its clean lines pulled taught, cutting across the image. But what you are also looking at what is probably the last thing somebody saw before he died. It’s eerie, elegiac, even monumental in its simplicity.

On one of these visits, I heard a young couple walk by and sneer loudly about how ridiculous it was that somebody had taken a photo of power lines and called it art. It struck me hard. It felt like they were not only dismissing the art, but the whole life and untimely, violent death of Brian Christopher Smith, whoever he may have been. It was crass, even cruel. All it took to understand this piece on its most cursory level was to read the title.

  #art    #deborah luster    #tooth for an eye    #contemporary art    #photography  
Why are you featuring Joe Scanlan's Donelle Woolford project? You do understand that Joe Scanlan is a fifty-something year old white male art professor/critic/artist who created a fictional black female artist named Donelle Woolford as an exploitative way of displaying his own work right?


blackcontemporaryart:

Not sure what you’re referencing but we’d like to take this moment to highlight Coco Fusco’s brilliant read of the Woolford project here

Don’t make assumptions about what we know and don’t know. Thanks for following!

Black power, 
BCA

Update to the whole Biennial/Donelle Woolford/Joe Scanlan affair: Joe Scanlan was recently revealed to be a fictitious creation by the artist Ryan Wong.

This certainly makes the debate more interesting (convoluted? scary?).

  #art  
water-stained:

Sam Francis, Composition: Yellow and Red, 1956. Watercolor and gouache on paper. Bechtler Museum of Modern Art.

water-stained:

Sam Francis, Composition: Yellow and Red, 1956. Watercolor and gouache on paper. Bechtler Museum of Modern Art.

  #art  

water-stained:

Roger White

Chloe, 2008

Shelf, 2012

  #Art  
water-stained:

Gianna Commito
Deck, 2010. Watercolor, casein, and marble dust ground on panel.

water-stained:

Gianna Commito

Deck, 2010. Watercolor, casein, and marble dust ground on panel.

  #art  
water-stained:

Eva Lundsager
With Many Turns or Windings 16, 2013. Watercolor on paper.

water-stained:

Eva Lundsager

With Many Turns or Windings 16, 2013. Watercolor on paper.

  #art  
water-stained:

Alan Shields, Tunnels of Amagination for Vicki, 1987. Watercolor with stitching on handmade paper.

water-stained:

Alan Shields, Tunnels of Amagination for Vicki, 1987. Watercolor with stitching on handmade paper.

  #art  
water-stained:

Mithu Sen
Untitled, 2009

water-stained:

Mithu Sen

Untitled, 2009

  #art    #indian art    #women artists    #contemporary  
water-stained:

Mithu Sen
Untitled, 2009

water-stained:

Mithu Sen

Untitled, 2009

  #art  

water-stained:

John Singer Sargent

Pomegranates, 1908

Gourds, 1908

  #art  
water-stained:

Elaine de Kooning, Spring, 1965. Watercolor and gouache on paper.

water-stained:

Elaine de Kooning, Spring, 1965. Watercolor and gouache on paper.

  #art  
water-stained:

Nanha (India), The Emperor Shah Jahan with his Son Dara Shikoh, folio from the Shah Jahan Album, c. 1620. Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper. Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. [zoomable image]

water-stained:

Nanha (India), The Emperor Shah Jahan with his Son Dara Shikoh, folio from the Shah Jahan Album, c. 1620. Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper. Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. [zoomable image]

  #art  

water-stained:

Spencer Finch

Poke in the Eye, 1997

False Color Image #1 (Exploding Star/Acute Schizophrenia), 2000

  #art  
water-stained:

Alf Löhr watercolor

water-stained:

Alf Löhr watercolor

  #art